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    The Business and Legal Environment Assignment Help

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    The Business and Legal Environment Assignment Help


    The Business and Legal Environment

    What is this subject about?

    Subject Overview
    This subject provides an introductory overview of the legal context for doing business within the Tourism and Hospitality industry. In this first year subject, students will be exposed to aspects of the legal environment relevant to making business decisions such as consumer law, insurance law and work health and safety regulations, with particular application to tourism and hospitality activities.

    Subject Evaluation
    We welcome student feedback so we can keep improving the subject overall. Students are strongly encouraged to provide feedback through AAPoly’s Student Feedback/Evaluation Systems which will be available in Week 9 to Week 11. A link will be made available on the LMS.


    Changes to the subject based on student feedback -
    As a result of recent student, lecturer and industry feedback, we have made improvements to this subject, to better support student learning and engagement which include:

    Providing an updated version of the textbook to ensure access to contemporary case studies and examples and tutorial exercises
    Assessment task one (1) was changed to decrease student workload.
    We continue to welcome your feedback through either formal or informal mechanisms.

    Student workload
    The minimum total expected workload to achieve the learning outcomes for this subject is 125-140 hours per semester typically comprising a mixture of scheduled learning activities and independent study.

    Students will need to spend an average of 9-12 hours per week over the semester studying in this subject. This will include:
    a) scheduled learning activities
    b) lecturer directed learning 3 face-to-face contact hours per week
    c) peer directed learning
    d) online engagement
    e) independent study
    f) preparing answers to tutorial questions before each tutorial
    g) checking the LMS for each week's tasks
    h) preparation for scheduled activities
    i) participating in LMS forums and other online discussions
     
    Teaching Strategies
    This subject is delivered through a series of lectures and in-class discussions.


    Week 1 – 3
    In the first three weeks of the semester students will be introduced to the business and legal framework in Australia. Through LMS forum discussions student will learn to research information from reliable sources. Relevant websites listed in this subject guide will be used to facilitate problem-solving and case study analysis.
     
    Week 4 – 6
    Many first-year students struggle with recognising judicial opinion such as, the holding, the rationale, or the court’s effort to distinguish an earlier precedent. Through “Case Analysis” Exercises students will have opportunity to practice dissecting cases from the prescribed text books and by using the IRAC method to facilitate recognition of judicial opinion.
     
    Week 6 – 11
    After teaching students how to use case analysis exercises to solve the case studies, students will practice formulating an analytical “game plan” for various legal issues; this will support student preparation for the final exam. Since different issues are governed by different rules and precedents, every analytical game plan will be unique in its particulars — but in formulating these game plans, students will be taught a basic approach that they can follow time and time again to solve these cases accordingly.
     
    Week 12
    Subject topics will be revised in class in preparation for the final exam. Group discussions will be encouraged in class to solve sample exam case studies and feedback will be given after the group discusses their finding.

    Prescribed Text or Publications
    James, N. (2017). Business Law (4th Ed.). Australia: Wiley Publications. ISBN: 9780730343769

    Academic Advice
    This subject sets a context of the legal environment that the tourism and hospitality industry operates within. Tourism and hospitality is a regulated industry and is affected by both local and international policies and laws. Understanding the implications of regulations in the industry will be useful in any business context.

    AAPoly Graduate Attributes
    The subjects in your course, including this subject, have been designed to facilitate the development of the AAPoly Graduate Attributes:

    Students will have the opportunity to develop skills that encourage critical thinking and life-long learning to cope with the continually changing nature of work; become effective communicators in an increasingly digital environment; socially responsible and culturally aware global citizens and collaborative achievers. AAPoly graduates are prepared to be career ready in their chosen fields and have the skills and techniques to expand their knowledge.

    Subject Learning Outcomes
    The following outcomes describe what a student will know, understand and be able to do, upon completion of this subject.

    Subject Schedule
    The following weekly schedule is indicative of the material that will be covered each week. The lecturer will provide more information on any changes that may be needed to the schedule.

    Assessment Overview
    Students are required to achieve 50% of the available marks in order to successfully pass the subject. The assessment information below provides a brief description of the assessment tasks in this subjects relative to the marks awarded.

    Assessment Rationale
    The formative assessment (Week 4) provides an indication of the students’ ability to engage with the subject’s content and identify the level of their academic skills. Students who indicate the need for extra support in academic writing and English language are provided with additional support.

    The second assignment (Week 9) is an individual assignment testing students’ ability to analyse legal issues and solve problems based on the specific parameters of the case- study. Students are also expected to examine certain types of law and provide recommendations based on their understanding of the topic.

    Summative assessment is in the form of an exam with limited use of resources, based on an analysis of a case scenario.

     
    Task description:
     Task 1A – ‘Research Assignment Essay Plan’ Task Length:250 words
    Date Due:During ‘Week 4’….. (A ’Hard Copy’ to be handed in during the ‘Week 4 Class’)

    Task Weight:10%

    Task Requirements:
    Assignment Question will uploaded on LMS in Week 2
    A question involving analysis, discussion and reflection on fundamental principles under ‘The Australian Legal System’.
     
    Criteria used to grade this task:
    The Assignment learning process is examined to demonstrate the nature and depth of learning and insights gained by the student through reflection.
    See the Rubric for detailed marking criteria and allocation.
    Submission Details
    Submissions must be made by the Student Personally ‘hand-delivering’ a ‘Hard Copy of the Plan’ to the Lecturer - in the Week 4 Class.

     Task 1B – ‘Research Assignment Essay’ Task Length:1,250-1,500 words
    Date Due:End of Week 4 - (by no later than 11.59 pm, Sunday 22nd. April 2018)
    Task Weight:20%
    Task Requirements:
    Assignment Questions will be uploaded on the LMS in Week 2;
    A question involving analysis, discussion and reflection on fundamental principles under ‘The Australian Legal System’.
     
    Criteria used to grade this task:
    The Assignment learning process is examined to demonstrate the nature and depth of learning and insights gained by the student through reflection.
    See the Rubric for detailed marking criteria and allocation.
    Submission Details
    Submissions must be online via the Turnitin Link available in LMS.
    Feedback and Return of Work
    Feedback and marks will be provided via the Turnitin within two weeks of submission

     
    Task Requirements:
    Case Scenario on ‘Business Structures’ will be uploaded on LMS

    Criteria used to grade this task:
    Identification of the Main issues in the provided Case Scenario including:
    identifying and discussing the various types of business structures within a legal context in Australia, and
    Providing advice on the advantages and disadvantages of using various types of business structures through the use of legal research techniques.

    A paper-based foreign language dictionary
    Students may bring their summary notes in English but not  textbooks  or photocopies (refer to specific instructions below)
    No electronic devices are allowed.

    There are SIX (6) Short Case Scenarios in the Final Exam. However, Students must select only FOUR (4) Case Studies to answer. Each Question is worth 10 marks.

    Each Case Study has TWO (2) Sub-Questions based on the Case - and each Sub-Question is worth 5 marks. Students MUST answer BOTH of these sub- questions.

    Students are expected to write 100-150 words (approximately half a page) for each answer.

    A 2-hour final examination  will be held during  the examination  period.   Attending   all classes (all lectures and tutorials), undertaking the week-by-week reading, and preparing summaries, throughout the semester, are all excellent  ways  of preparing for the examination.

    This Examination Is a Limited Open Notes Examination:
    Allowed Material: 6 Single Sided A4 Pages.or 3 Double Sided pages - handwritten in English or typed notes in English.
    No other material including any text books or electronic devices are allowed
     
    Solve problems related to the laws of consumer protection, tort, insurance, contract, employment, competition;
     
    Identify legal rights, roles and responsibilities;
    Summarise and relate legal precedents to solve business problems.

    Hurdles and Assessment Rules
    Students are required to achieve 50% of the available marks in order to successfully pass the subject.

    Assignments that are submitted after the due date, without prior agreement from your Lecturer/Subject Facilitator will attract a late penalty of 10% of the available marks per day (or part thereof) inclusive of weekends and public holidays.

    Request for Special Consideration
    Details of the policy and processes for students applying for extensions and/or Special Consideration are detailed in the HE Study Guide available on AAPoly website.

    Review of Results and Appeals
    Students have a right to feedback of their assessments; review of their assessment submission or exam and to appeal their final grade. Details of the policy and processes for students applying for assessment review or appeal are detailed in the HE Study Guide available on AAPoly website.


    Academic Referencing
    In your written work you will need to support your ideas by referring to scholarly literature. It is important that you understand how to correctly refer to the work of others, and how to maintain academic integrity.

    Failure to appropriately acknowledge the ideas of others constitutes academic dishonesty (plagiarism), a matter considered by AAPoly as a serious academic offence.

    Referencing Style
    The American Psychological Association (APA) referencing style will be used as a standard for this subject. Information on the APA Referencing Style can be found here: http://www.apastyle.org/learn/tutorials/basics-tutorial.aspx. More general resources can be found on the LMS and/or from the Library website. Academic Support Workshops will be available to assist you.

    Academic Integrity
    Academic integrity is about honest presentation of your academic work. It means acknowledging the work of others while developing your own insights, knowledge and ideas.

    You can achieve academic integrity by honestly submitting work that is your own. Academic integrity can be compromised by:

    a) cheating,
    b) plagiarism,
    c) collusion;
    presenting somebody else’s work as your own;
    allowing another student to copy work for an assignment or an examination, and
    any other conduct by which a student:
    seeks to gain, for themselves or for any other person, any academic advantage or advancement to which they or that other person are not entitled; or
    improperly disadvantaging any other student.

    Students engaging in any form of academic misconduct will be dealt with under the Academic Misconduct and Plagiarism Policy and this can include imposition of penalties that range from a deduction/cancellation of marks to exclusion from AAPoly. Details of penalties that can be imposed are available via LMS.

    It is the student’s responsibility to ensure that other students do not copy their work.
    You will be advised by your lecturer if the use of Turnitin or other plagiarism reporting software is required.

    Student Academic Misconduct and Plagiarism Policy and Procedure are available on AAPoly website.
    Academic Progress
    Students are required to maintain satisfactory progress throughout their course of studies. Academic Intervention Strategies will be put in place for students who are not performing to a satisfactory standard. Students have the right to appeal administrative and academic decisions. The Policy on Academic Progress is available on AAPoly website.

    What Learning Opportunities are Available?
    Learning Management System (LMS)

    The Learning Management System (LMS) which is also called MOODLE, provides the core materials (excluding the textbook) that students need to access to support their studies. While each subject may look a little different, students can access/download their lecture and tutorial material, assessment information, online quizzes, study and library skills information and exam preparation material.

    The LMS should be your main source of subject content and information. Your lecturer will provide you with information on how to use the resources available on the LMS. Academic Support Sessions are available to assist you in maximising your access to the subject material available.

    Resources
    Recommended Readings/Additional Resources
    Bachelor of Tourism and Hospitality Management Program Handbook
    Higher Education Supplement Handbook

    Books
    Barth, S. (2009). Hospitality Law: Managing Legal Issues in the Hospitality Industry. New Jersey: John Wiley and Sons.
    Gibson, A. and Fraser, D, (2014). Business law (8th Ed.). French Forest NSW: Pearson.
    Latimer, P. (2016) Australian Business Law (35th Ed.). South Melbourne, VIC: Oxford University Press.
    MacIntyre, E. (2016). Business Law. Pearson.
    Vickery, R., & Flood, M. (2012). Australian Business Law: Compliance and Practice (7th Ed.). Pearson.

    Relevant Journal Articles
    Australian Competition and Consumer Commission. (2010). Travel Law Quarterly, 2(4), 236.
    Barravecchio, J. A. (2013). The Tort of Negligence. Legaldate, 25(4), 4.
    McNaughton, A. (2012). The Law of Contract, Basic Principles and Cases -- Is Contract Law Effective in Protecting the Rights of Individuals?. Legaldate, 24(2), 6-8.
    Paterson, J. M. (2013). Developments in Consumer Protection Law in Australia.
    Legaldate, 25(2), 2.
    Starke, A. (2011). Under Cover. Australian Hotelier, 28(5), 14-18.

    a) Relevant Journal Titles
    b) Hospitality Law
    c) International Law Update
    d) Journal of Corporation Law
    e) Labor Law Journal
    f) Lawyer
    g) Travel Law Quarterly

    Internet Websites
    Specialist Facilities, Resources or Equipment Required

    None
    Availability of Laptop Computers and/or Smart Devices, Accounts
    Students are encouraged to bring to class laptops and/or smart devices such as tablets and/or smart phones. While AAPoly provides computer access, printing and photocopying services for all students, students who have their own devices will be able to access the LMS in class and relevant support resources. Many companies offer educational prices for both hardware and software to higher education students. Check the various websites for more information.

    Learning Expectations
    AAPoly is committed to high standards of professional and academic conduct in all activities, and holds its commitment and responsibilities to its students as being of paramount importance. Likewise, it is the student’s responsibility to be aware of the requirements of this subject and all the assessments necessary to be successful in the subject.

    Student Workload
    The minimum total expected workload to achieve the learning outcomes for this subject is 125-140 hours per semester typically comprising a mixture of scheduled learning activities and independent study.

    Students will need to spend on average of 9-12 hours per week over the semester studying in this subject. This will include:

    scheduled learning activities
    teacher directed learning 3 face-to-face contact hours per week
    peer directed learning
    online engagement

    independent study
    preparing answers to tutorial questions before each tutorial
    checking LMS for each week's tasks
    preparation for scheduled activities
    participating in LMS discussions
    preparation towards assessments

    All the subjects in the Bachelor of Tourism and Hospitality Management (BTHM) course require significant commitment outside of formal class contact hours.

    Attendance and Participation
    It is expected that each student attends every class of every enrolled subject. It is our experience that students who regularly attend classes and complete all the activities and assessment tasks achieve better academic performance, whilst those that do not regularly attend classes and do not complete all the activities and assessment tasks is likely conclude with poor academic performance. It is in your interest to make every effort to attend all the classes for this subject and to complete all of the assessment tasks.
     
    Communication, Consultation and Appointments
    Your lecturer will advise you of the best way to communicate with them and make individual appointments when you need assistance.

    To keep up with announcements regarding this subject
    Each subject has a Forum/Discussion Tool to enable lecturers to post regular announcements, reminders and important information about the subject. Students should check the Forum on a regular basis. The subject Forum/Discussion will appear on the very top of the subject’s LMS site. There will often be questions and answers that students will find very valuable, and it is a good resource to assist you in communicating with your lecturer and with other students who may have similar questions.

    When you have an issue that will impact on your studies or submission of an assessment task
    If you have a personal issue that will affect your studies or your grades, you should make an appointment to speak with your lecturer and/or seek an appointment with the Academic Coordinator, Student Counsellor and/or other support resources. Your lecturer will have identified how you can make an appointment with them.

    Communication
    AAPOLY will communicate with you via your AAPoly Student email (xxxxx@aapoly.edu.au). The LMS also has a private message function that enables you to communicate directly to your lecturer. These messages will not be seen by other students. Your  lecturer  will respond to you via this private message function. This is the best way to communicate with your lecturer.

    To keep informed, please check your AAPoly email and the LMS Messages and Forums as often as possible.
     
    Additional Academic Support and Counselling
    Additional Academic Support and Counselling Services are available for all students. The details for Academic Skills Sessions and Support Services are available via the LMS. Contact your lecturers for assistance.