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    Sustainable Development Assignment Help


    Sustainable Development Assignment Help

    Evaluate the United nation sustainable development goals as tools to progress sustainability

    Introduction

    Data considered as life blood of decision-making and the raw material for accountability. Transitions are marked as an processes in which socio-technical systems change fundamentally over a generation, or as a radical, structural change achieved in incremental steps. Radical changes are essential because incremental development can lead to lock-ins and sub-optimization. It is thus vital to prevent lock-in of unsustainable technologies and practices while introducing social and technical innovations. In this connection, van Eijnatten defines a successful transformative change as a transition from “old thinking, old doing” to “new thinking, new doing”. A transition is a result of changes or developments in different domains such as culture, ecology, economy, technology, institutions, or belief systems—ones that reinforce each other. Changes in one system might affect the interrelated systems and cause unwanted effects. Thus, cooperation and interrelationships between systems and actors play a crucial role in the transformation. It can be ensured that transformation is a result of actions in different systems and at different levels of one system.

    Disasters results in destroying  communities in seconds, its the resilience that putting the welfare of those with the least, first. With those priorities in mind, sub-national reporting such as this city-level Report provides context for communities to focus on progress closest to home and offer a tool to support community members who are advocating for positive change where they live (Sachs et al. 2018). This report and index offer an analysis of progress and opportunities in US cities towards achievement of these SDGs. There is much progress to be  made in US cities if the SDGs are to be achieved by 2030

    Research methodology

    A pivotal element is the identification of the targets, as many objectives laid down by the 17 SDGs (and their related 169 targets) are not defined in quantitative terms. However, a discussion on how to address the critical requirements for selecting the most appropriate set of SDGs indicators is not the objective of our analysis. An SDGs indicator set preferably aligns as closely as possible with the targets put forward in the United Nations 2030 Agenda. The UN Statistical Commission is currently developing an indicator framework for monitoring and reporting the SDGs implementation process globally, acknowledging that different indicators might be appropriate in different contexts. Optimal use of statistical indicators to measure the SDGs is country context-dependent and, in general, coverage issues are seen high  and  also more comparability on the one hand and detail and availability of information on the other hand. Neighbouring states have started developing their own set of indicators to assist them in monitoring progress made in their national SDG implementation policy, typically in the context of activities related to the Voluntary National Reviews. At the same time, the various National Statistical Offices collaborate with the UN Statistical Commission, contributing to the SDG Progress annual report prepared by the General Secretary of the United Nations, which also allows for a comparison of the progress of the various countries at global level.

    Tool applications and their application functions

    INDICATORS OF SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT

    1.1.1 Proportion of population below the international poverty line, by sex, age, employment status and geographical location (urban/rural)

    1.2.1 Proportion of population living below the national poverty line, by sex and age

    1.2.2 Proportion of men, women and children of all ages living in poverty in all its dimensions according to national definitions

    1.3.1 Proportion of population covered by social protection floors/systems, by sex, distinguishing children, unemployed persons, older persons, persons with disabilities, pregnant women, newborns, work-injury victims and the poor and the vulnerable

    1.4.1 Proportion of population living in households with access to basic services

    1.4.2 Proportion of total adult population with secure tenure rights to land, with legally recognized documentation and who perceive their rights to land as secure, by sex and by type of tenure

    1.5.1 Number of deaths, missing persons and persons affected by disaster per 100,000 peoplea

    1.5.2 Direct disaster economic loss in relation to global gross domestic product (GDP)a

    1.5.3 Number of countries with national and local disaster risk reduction strategiesa

    1.a.1 Proportion of resources allocated by the government directly to poverty reduction programmes

     

    1.a.2 Proportion of total government spending on essential services (education, health and social protection)

    1.b.1 Proportion of government recurrent and capital spending to sectors that disproportionately benefit women, the poor and vulnerable groups

     

     

    By 2030 end all forms of malnutrition, including achieving by 2025 the internationally agreed targets on stunting and wasting in children under five years of age, and address the nutritional needs of adolescent girls, pregnant and lactating women, and older persons

     

     

     
     
     

    By 2030 double the agricultural productivity and the incomes of small-scale food producers, particularly women, indigenous peoples, family farmers, pastoralists and fishers, including through secure and equal access to land, other productive resources and inputs, knowledge, financial services, markets, and opportunities for value addition and non-farm employment

     

     

     
     
     

    by 2030 ensure sustainable food production systems and implement resilient agricultural practices that increase productivity and production, that help maintain ecosystems, that strengthen capacity for adaptation to climate change, extreme weather, drought, flooding and other disasters, and that progressively improve land and soil quality

     

     

     
     
     

    by 2020 maintain genetic diversity of seeds, cultivated plants, farmed and domesticated animals and their related wild species, including through soundly managed and diversified seed and plant banks at national, regional and international levels, and ensure access to and fair and equitable sharing of benefits arising from the utilization of genetic resources and associated traditional knowledge as internationally agreed

     

     

     
     
     

     increase investment, including through enhanced international cooperation, in rural infrastructure, agricultural research and extension services, technology development, and plant and livestock gene banks to enhance agricultural productive capacity in developing countries, in particular in least developed countries

     

     

     
     
     

    correct and prevent trade restrictions and distortions in world agricultural markets including by the parallel elimination of all forms of agricultural export subsidies and all export measures with equivalent effect, in accordance with the mandate of the Doha Development Round

     

     

     
     
     

    adopt measures to ensure the proper functioning of food commodity markets and their derivatives, and facilitate timely access to market information, including on food reserves, in order to help limit extreme food price volatility"

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Strategic tools support the inclusion of environmental objectives in policies and plans, and can help policy makers increase coherence between sectoral and thematic policies and plans. These tools can be used to ensure appropriate weighting of the environmental dimensions of the SDGs in development plans. The use of these tools requires governmental and other stakeholders to engage with one another. Their potential lies in the opportunity to strengthen the position of environmental stakeholders while creating wider “umbrella” collaborative networks and cooperative arrangements among diverse sectors, institutions, and groups with different interests. We advocate for the utilization of a discourse of ‘directed change or transition’ as a means to develop CSA method that is capable of supporting decision-making toward SD based on a comprehensive and systematic assessment of the company. Sustainability as a process of directed change has been discussed within the fields of transition theory and transformational view. Three metaphors can describe this discourse, including transformation, sustainability transition, and reformist-radical change continuum . This discourse is based on the critics of ‘business as usual’. Its strength is the ability of the SD concept to change in response to knowledge generation. Nabavi et al. state that SD is a pathway that must be continuously constructed based on our values and knowledge about the systems.

    According to the transformative approach to sustainability, the root of the problems in the environment and society is in the fundamental characteristics of the society and its interrelations with the environment. To avoid a crisis, therefore, radical changes are necessary. This calls for a transformation of society and human relations with the environment. This is supported by Kemp, who states that SD is a redirection of development and a never-ending process of progressive social change that evolves multiple transitions or system innovations. SD requires radical changes in the functional system and governance, needs and wants, cultures and practices. Transition theory is proposed as one of the relevant approaches to better understand and support societal adaptation to sustainability.

    Transitions can be represented as transformation processes in which socio-technical systems change fundamentally over a generation, or as a radical, structural change achieved in incremental steps. Radical changes are essential because incremental development can lead to lock-ins and sub-optimisation. It is thus vital to prevent lock-in of unsustainable technologies and practices while introducing social and technical innovations. In this connection, van Eijnatten defines a successful transformative change as a transition from “old thinking, old doing” to “new thinking, new doing”.A transition is a result of changes or developments in different domains such as culture, ecology, economy, technology, institutions, or belief systems—ones that reinforce each other. Changes in one system might affect the interrelated systems and cause unwanted effects. Thus, cooperation and interrelationships between systems and actors play a crucial role in the transformation. It can be considered as that transformation is a result of actions in different systems and at different levels of one system. Therefore, a transformation process must deal with complex interactions within the system as well as between the systems. They are treated as frameworks in analyzing the actual decisions

    Taking strong initiative in the areas of the development of new global goals for humanity’s future aimed at an challenging plans and ideas. It involved to ensure that the provisioning of the different key tests was included in order to identify the quantitative values of the proposed plan quality and also to meet the desired set targets and areas of improvements of the set targets to ensure they are well met in advance , aiming at ensuring that the developmental progress is made and also stakeholders are well maintained to grow their businesses and firms challenging issues in line with the government bodies this aims at developing a sustainable environment towards the community and to eradicate the challenges faced in the nations, this also aims to well establish the society and human values in the sustainable development plans and strategies.

    References

    Introduction

    1 1.2019,Big Data for Sustainable Development,United nations, www.un.org/en/sections/issues depth,02-Oct-2019

    2. 2019, The puck goes into the corner and you chase it - CANVISAS Immigration Consultants Edmonton,CANVISAS Immigration Consultants Edmonton,http://www.canvisas.ca/the-puck-goes-into-the-corner-and-you-chase-it/,02-Oct-2019

    3. 2019,Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) | UN Office for Sustainable Development,Unosd.un.org,https://unosd.un.org/content/sustainable-development-goals,02-Oct-2019

    Research Methodology

    1. 2019,Big Data for Sustainable Development,http://www.un.org/en/sections/issues-depth/big-data-sustainable-development/index.html,02-Oct-2019

    Tool applications and its functions

    1. 2019,Undp.org,https://www.undp.org/content/dam/undp/library/Environment and Energy/sustainable_land_management/Environmental_Dimensions_of_SDGs_in_Asia.pdf,02-Oct-2019

    Table

    1. 2019,#Envision2030 Goal

    2: Zero Hunger | United Nations Enable,https://www.un.org/development/desa/disabilities/envision2030-goal2.html,02-Oct-2019

    2. 2019,Goal 2: Zero hunger | UNDP,https://www.undp.org/content/undp/en/home/sustainable-development-goals/goal-2-zero-hunger.html,02-Oct-2019

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