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    IMPORTANT Assignment Help

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    IMPORTANT Assignment Help


     IMPORTANT: For this assignment you will have to submit: 

     
    o A file containing script docdistances required for exercise 4. 
    o A file containing script PCAEx5 required for exercise 5. 
    o A file containing function subtractMean required for exercise 5. 
    o A file containing function myPCA required for exercise 5. 
    o A file containing function projectData required for exercise 5. 

    The following files are provided for the exercises: 
    Six files containing text of RedRidingHood.txt, PrincessPea.txt, Cinderella.txt, CAFA1.txt, CAFA2.txt and CAFA3.txt required for exercise 4. 
    A file pcadata.mat required for exercise 5. 
    A file pcafaces.mat required for exercise 5. 
    A file containing a function recoverData.m required for exercise 5. 
    A file containing a function displayData.m required for exercise 5. 

    If you will write any other extra function or script as part of your solution for these exercises, you should also submit these. For these extra functions or scripts, you can choose the file name.

    EXERCISE 4 (10 points) 
    In this exercise you will write a script called docdistances that will calculate distances between pairs of text documents. These distances will be based on a vanilla version of term frequency–inverse document frequency (tf-idf). Your script will calculate the distances between 6 documents: 3 documents are synopsis of fairy tales (Red riding hood, the Princess and the pea and Cinderella); the other 3 documents are the abstract of papers related to protein function prediction (identified as CAFA1, CAFA2 and CAFA3). You will find these documents on the Moodle page (the files name are: RedRidingHood.txt, PrincessPea.txt, Cinderella.txt, CAFA1.txt, CAFA2.txt, CAFA3.txt). 
    Your script will: 
    1. For each document, calculate its tf-idf vector. 

    The tf-idf vector of a document is a vector whose length is equal to the total number of different terms (words) which are present in the corpus (in this case, the corpus is the entire set of 6 documents). Each term is assigned a specific element of the vector, which is in the same position for the tf-idf vector of every document. For a given document d, the vector element corresponding to term t is calculated as the product of 2 values: 
    a) Term frequency: the number of times that term t appears in document d 
    b) Inverse document frequency: the log base 10 of the inverse fraction of the documents that contain the term, i.
    It is interesting to note that the 2 types of documents form 2 clear groups: the synopsis of fairy tales are more similar to each other than they are to scientific papers. Also, the Princess and the pea is more similar to Cinderella than to Red Riding Hood, and this makes sense as the Princess and the pea and Cinderella have many more elements in common … 
    [HINT: the functions textread and pdist could be useful for exercise 4] 

    EXERCISE 5 

    In this exercise you will explore Principal Components Analysis (PCA). The exercise is divided in 2 parts. In the first part, you will work with a small toy dataset of artificial data, developing functions needed for carrying out PCA. In the second part, you will work with a larger dataset of real world data (images of faces of famous people), and you will be able to re-use the functions you wrote for the small toy dataset on a larger scale. 
    Note that this is a good approach to use when implementing algorithms: make sure that they work well on small datasets and then apply them to your real problem. Remember that the implementation for the small dataset needs to be efficient, otherwise its execution time will be very large when applied to the larger dataset. 
    For both datasets, you will: 
    1. Calculate the principal components of your data 
    2. Project your high dimensional data onto (a smaller space defined by) a few principal components 
    3. Recover your original high dimensional data by re-projecting back the projected data onto the original space. 

    Note also that this exercise is about implementing PCA yourself, so you cannot use any of the different functions available in Matlab which implement it (e.g. pca). You will have to calculate the principal components through the eigendecomposition of the covariance matrix of the data (you will need to use the Matlab function eig for the eigendecomposition). 

    Part 1 (8 points) 
     
    You will write a script called PCAEx5 which will work on a small dataset of 50 random points, Gaussian distributed, in 2D. These are contained in the file pcadata.mat, available on the Moodle page. Your script will: 

    1. Load the datapoints contained in the file pcadata.mat. Let us call X this initial set of datapoints. X has size 50x2 as there are 50 points in 2 dimensions. 

    2. Create Figure 1. In this figure, plot the points as blue circles in 2D, in a figure whose axis are set in the range xmin = 0, xmax=7, ymin=2, ymax=8 

    3. Call a function called subtractMean that you will also write and include in the submission. The function receives a dataset (i.e. a matrix) as the only input argument, and returns two arguments: a dataset obtained from the input dataset by subtracting its mean; and the mean of the input dataset. Your script will run this function on your dataset X, and obtain a new dataset Xmu and the mean of X, which we shall call mu. 

    4. Call a function called myPCA that you will also write and include in the submission. This function receives a dataset (i.e. a matrix) as the only input argument, and returns two arguments: the first is a matrix in which the columns are the principal components (i.e. the eigenvectors of the covariance matrix of the dataset) and the second is the set of corresponding eigenvalues. The eigenvectors will need to be ordered according to the size of their corresponding eigenvalues, in decreasing order; that is, the first column will be the eigenvector corresponding to the largest eigenvalue, the second column will be the eigenvector corresponding to the second largest eigenvalue, and so on. 

    Your script will run this function on your dataset Xmu, and obtain a matrix U of principal components and a vector S with their corresponding eigenvalues. 

    [HINT: the principal components are the eigenvectors of the covariance matrix of the data. So to implement this step you will need the function cov for calculating the covariance of the data, and the function eig, for calculating eigenvalues and eigenvectors.] 

    5. Add to Figure 1 the plot of the 2 principal components, in which the first component (corresponding to the largest eigenvalue) is red, and the second one is green. Your Figure 1 should look similar to Figure A below. Also print out on the command window the coordinates of the top eigenvector. 

    [HINT: you can use the command line to draw the eigenvector. Do not forget that the eigenvectors were calculated from data from which the mean had been subtracted. So you will need to add the mean to the eigenvectors in order to make the plot.] 

    6. Call a function called projectData that you will also write and include in the submission. The function receives 3 arguments: a dataset (i.e. a matrix), a set of eigenvectors and a positive integer k. It provides as the only output argument a dataset obtained by projecting the input dataset onto the first k eigenvectors. Note that the first k eigenvectors are the k eigenvectors corresponding to the k largest eigenvalues. 

    Your script will run this function on your dataset Xmu, using the eigenvectors in U and with k equal to 1 and obtain a matrix Z of projected data. 
    [HINT: here the projection of a datapoint onto an eigenvector can be obtained by calculating the dot product between the point and the vector, since the eigenvectors you obtain from Matlab have unit norm]. 

    7. Print in the command window the projection of the first 3 points in your dataset, i.e. Z(1:3, :). 

    8. Call a function recoverData provided on the Moodle page. The function receives 4 arguments: a dataset (i.e. a matrix), a set of eigenvectors, a positive integer k and a vector mu. It provides as the only output argument a dataset obtained by projecting back your points onto the original space. 

    Using the variable names described above the call in your script call would be: 
    Xrec = recoverData(Z, U, K, mu) 
    Note that this function will work correctly only if the eigenvectors in U are ordered according to the size of their corresponding eigenvalues, in decreasing order, as explained in point 4. 
    Your script will run the above line obtaining in Xrec the recovered datapoints. 
     
    9. Create Figure 2. In this figure, plot the points as blue circles in 2D, in a figure whose axis are set in the range xmin = 0, xmax=7, ymin=2, ymax=8. Then add the recovered points as red stars. (Using the variable names described above your recovered points will be contained in the variable Xrec). Your Figure 2 should look similar to the Figure B below. 

     In this part of the exercise you will repeat on a larger real world dataset exactly the same analysis that you have already performed on the small toy dataset. Your script will use the functions you have written for the small toy dataset. Your script will work on a dataset of 5000 images of faces of famous people, taken from a public repository. Each image is a 32x32 matrix of pixel which has been linearized into a vector of size 1024. These images are contained in the file pcafaces.mat, available on the Moodle page. 
    1. Load the datapoints contained in the file pcafaces.mat. Let us call X this initial set of datapoints. X has size 5000x1024, as there are 5000 faces, each represented by a vector of pixels of size 1024. (This is a large dataset so it might take a few seconds, depending on your machine). 

    2. Create Figure 3. Use the function displayData provided on the Moodle page to display the first 100 images in the datasets. Using the variable names described above the call in your script call would be: 

    3. Subtract the mean from X using your function subtractMean 

    4. Project the data onto the first 200 principal components using your function projectData 

    5. Recover your images back onto the original space using the function recoverData (which is provided on the Moodle page). 

    6. Create Figure 4. This figure will contain 2 subplots. The first subplot will display the first 100 images of the original data (that is, it will be the same as Figure 3). The second subplot will display the first 100 images of the reconstructed data – in this way you will be able to compare how good your reconstruction is! Your Figure 4 should look similar to the Figure D below. 

    For fun, you can experiment and check the quality of the reconstructed faces for different number of principal components… 

     It will be important to provide input and output parameters to the functions as requested in the exercises. Unless explicitly specified in the exercise, avoid using the “input” function or printing outputs on the command window. 
    Marks will be given for writing elegant, compact, vectorised code, avoiding the use of “loops” (for or while loops) where possible, and including comments.