+91-9519066910

Assignment

Computing Skills Assignment Help

Matlab Assignment Help

case study Assignment help

Rating:
case study Assignment help

 Sandia Medical Devices (Australia)

Medical monitoring technology has advanced significantly in the last decade. Monitoring that once required a visit to a health-care facility can now be performed by devices located in a patient’s home or carried or worn at all times. Examples include measures of glucose level (blood sugar), pulse, blood pressure, and electrocardiogram (EKG). Measurements can be transmitted via telephone, Internet connection, and wireless data transmission standards, such as Bluetooth. A particularly powerful technology combination is a wearable device that records data periodically or continuously and transmits it via Bluetooth to a cell phone app. The cell phone app can inform the patient of problems and can automatically transmit data and alerts to a central monitoring application.

Health-care providers and patients incur significant costs when glucose levels are not maintained within acceptable tolerances. Short-term episodes of very high or very low glucose often result in expensive visits to urgent care clinics or hospitals. In addition, patients with frequent but less severe episodes of high or low glucose are more susceptible to such expensive, long-term complications as vision, circulatory, and kidney problems.

Sandia Medical Devices (SMD), an Australian manufacturer of portable and wearable medical monitoring devices, has developed a glucose monitor embedded in a wristband. The device is powered by body heat and senses glucose levels from minute quantities of perspiration. SMD is developing the Real-Time Glucose Monitoring (RTGM) device in partnership with Pacific Health Systems (PHS), a comprehensive health delivery service with patients throughout New South Wales. The system’s vision statement reads as follows:

RTGM will enable patients and their health-care providers to continuously monitor glucose levels, immediately identify short and long-term medical dangers, and rapidly respond to those dangers in medically appropriate ways.

SMD will develop the initial prototype software for smartphones with Bluetooth capability running the Google Android operating system. If successful, PHS and its patients will have free use of the software and SMD will resell the software to other health systems worldwide.

PHS must ensure that it’s systems comply with the relevant Australian regulations for storage of medical data.

Interviews with patients and physicians about potential RTGM capabilities and interaction modes identified several areas of concern that need to be incorporated into the system requirements and design. The relevant patient concerns include:

Viewing and interpreting data and trends. Patients want to be able to view more than their current glucose level. They would like to see glucose levels over various time periods, with a specific focus on time periods during which their glucose was within and outside of acceptable ranges. A graphical view of the data is preferred, although some patients also want to be able to see actual numbers.

Entering additional data. Some patients want to be able to enter text notes or voice messages to supplement glucose level data. For example, patients who see a high glucose alert might record voice messages describing how they feel or what they had recently eaten. Some patients thought that sharing such information with their health-care providers might be valuable, but others only wanted such information for themselves.

Physicians expressed these concerns:

                      

 

They do not want to be the “first line of response” to all alerts. They prefer that nurses or physician assistants be charged with that role and that physicians be notified only when frontline personnel determine that an emergency situation exists.

They want to be able to monitor and view past patient data and trends in much the same way as described for patients.

They want all their actions to be logged and for patient-]

Health-care providers and patients incur significant costs when glucose levels are not maintained within acceptable tolerances. Short-term episodes of very high or very low glucose often result in expensive visits to urgent care clinics or hospitals. In addition, patients with frequent but less severe episodes of high or low glucose are more susceptible to such expensive, long-term complications as vision, circulatory, and kidney problems.

Sandia Medical Devices (SMD), an Australian manufacturer of portable and wearable medical monitoring devices, has developed a glucose monitor embedded in a wristband. The device is powered by body heat and senses glucose levels from minute quantities of perspiration. SMD is developing the Real-Time Glucose Monitoring (RTGM) device in partnership with Pacific Health Systems (PHS), a comprehensive health delivery service with patients throughout New South Wales. The system’s vision statement reads as follows:

RTGM will enable patients and their health-care providers to continuously monitor glucose levels, immediately identify short and long-term medical dangers, and rapidly respond to those dangers in medically appropriate ways.

SMD will develop the initial prototype software for smartphones with Bluetooth capability running the Google Android operating system. If successful, PHS and its patients will have free use of the software and SMD will resell the software to other health systems worldwide.

PHS must ensure that it’s systems comply

Interviews with patients and physicians about potential RTGM capabilities and interaction modes identified several areas of concern that need to be incorporated into the system requirements and design. The relevant patient concerns include:

Viewing and interpreting data and trends. Patients want to be able to view more than their current glucose level. They would like to see glucose levels over various time periods, with a specific focus on time periods during which their glucose was within and outside of acceptable ranges. A graphical view of the data is preferred, although some patients also want to be able to see actual numbers.

Entering additional data. Some patients want to be able to enter text notes or voice messages to supplement glucose level data. For example, patients who see a high glucose alert might record voice messages describing how they feel or what they had recently eaten. Some patients thought that sharing such information with their heal

cpc case study test, japan 2011 tsunami case studykf case study,haiti case studyabbotts hall farm case studycase study of flood,case study presentation,change management case study,case study theory test,holderness coastline case study,curitiba case study,volcano case study,coca-cola case study,icaew case study,hm case study,chile earthquake 2010 case study,counseling case study examples,japan earthquake 2011 case study

 

 



 DOWNLOAD SAMPLE ANSWER


   

Details

  • Number of views:
    41
  • PRICE :
    AU$ 0.00

Submit Works

Drop File To Upload Or
BROWSE
Assignment Help Australia

Our Top Experts


Karen Betty

Holding a PhD degree in Finance, Dr. John Adams is experienced in assisting students who are in dire need...

55 - Completed Orders


Daphne Lip

Canada, Toronto I have acquired my degree from Campion College at the University of Regina Occuption/Desi...

52 - Completed Orders


Mr Roberto Tuzii

Even since I was a student in Italy I had a passion for languages, in fact I love teaching Italian, and I...

102 - Completed Orders


Harsh Gupta

To work with an organization where I can optimally utilize my knowledge and skills for meeting challenges...

109 - Completed Orders


ARNAB BANERJEE

JOB OBJECTIVE Seeking entry level assignments in Marketing & Business Development with an organization...

202 - Completed Orders


KARAN BHANDARI

Current work profile Project manager- The Researchers Hub (2nd Jan 2016 to presently working) Researc...

20 - Completed Orders


Tan Kumar Ali

Sales Assistant, Mito Marina Assigned to the Stationery dept – assisted in merchandising, stock taking...

100 - Completed Orders


Wesenu Irko

Personal Profile Dedicated and highly experienced private chauffeur. High energy, hardworking, punctua...

200 - Completed Orders